Archives

September 2004

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Sep 30

A while back, I heard that there existed a few colour photos, taken during World War I. So far, I failed to find out more, but today, I came across a few samples. I know nothing about the actual photographic process etc. To navigate click on the numbers (or use “vor” for “next” and “zurück” for “previous”). Update: I wasn’t too satisfied with the state of this post so I did some research. I came across this site that contains explanations and many photos/samples. The actual colour photos - there are many colourized b/w ones - were done using Auguste and Louis Lumi鑽e’s autochrome process. There are some more samples on this site. And if you really want to get some of those photos - plus the actual history of World War I - check out this book. And Simon Smith just sent me the link to the French archives that contain the photos (thanks!). If you don’t speak French: you access the photos at the top right-hand side. The photos are sorted by location. For each location, there is a list of the photos; on those pages without thumbnails you view the photos by clicking on the icon that looks like an eye.
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Sep 29

The other day, Stacy of the space in between wrote about the life and fate of Masahisa Fukase, and there is nothing to say about it for me other than: Go and read it.
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Sep 29

If I understand them correctly, Road Zero is a project done collectively by the photographers of Tendance Floue. (first seen at deFocused)
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Sep 29

“America is now offering lessons in what little wisdom it takes to govern the world. Confounded in Iraq, isolated from its traditional allies, shamed over Abu Ghraib, soaked in corporate corruption and the backwash of environmental harm, sustaining an uninherited budget deficit while preparing more tax rewards for the rich, as dismissive of the unhealthy as the foreign, as terrified of the unfolding truth as of mailed anthrax, it is a society made menacing by a notion of God’s great plan. America is tolerance-challenged, integrity-poor, frightened to death, and yet, beneath its patriotic hosannahs, a country in delirium before the recognition that it might have spent the last three years not only squandering the sympathy of the world but hot-housing hatreds more ferocious than those it had wished to banish for ever from the clear blue skies.” - Andrew O’Hagan in a pretty harsh piece about the Republican National Convention
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Sep 29

William Lamson’s work follows the tradition of William Eggleston. Here you can find a short interview with him.
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Sep 28

Gina Glover has a fairly large set of very nice projects (the page loaded very slowly here, though). I especially like “Seascape” and “Outside Time”.
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Sep 27

I’m not a big fan of street photography: If you want street photography take a walk! But be that as it may, other people like it, and I thought I’d share the link to iN-PUBLiC.com (yes, that’s how they write it!). (Many thanks to Tobias H., who has been sending many links, incl. this one, over the course of the past months)
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Sep 26

Today, the New York Times Magazine featured an article about political weblogs (note that depending on when you try to look at it it might have already disappeared in the commercial archive - at the time of this writing, it hasn’t). Unlike Conscientious, major political weblogs get thousands of visitors per hour and actually make money using ads. However, they tend to have a vastly lower signal-to-noise ratio (or maybe that’s just me).
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Sep 26

In an older edition of Digital Journalist, I discovered a special on Arnold Newman that is not to be missed. More samples: here and here; plus a nice article/interview here.
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Sep 24

Bettina Flitner is a photojournalist and filmmaker with a fairly large portfolio of interesting projects. Oddly enough, the navigation system is in English but the text comes up in German. So all those who don’t understand German can only look at the photos and will miss the context.
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Sep 24

You know, I didn’t want to spend too much time thinking or writing about politics. But when I look at the US election, what I see is some sort of bizarro-world version of Mr Roger’s Land of Make Believe where the nice Mr Rogers is being replaced by the presumably likable Mr Bush (it still escapes me what’s likable about somebody that callous, vain, and manipulative), and where the nice neighbourhood where everybody is friends with all the other people - the land of make believe, which in practice doesn’t really exist - is being replaced by a world full of terror and violence where it’s best to stomp on all other people who then are immensely grateful for having been raped and pillaged. Looking at the polls, it seems that at least half the well TV-trained audience is buying this.
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Sep 23

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders is one of the most important American portrait photographers. There’s just no way around seeing one of his photos someplace. This page has a conversation between Lou Reed (formerly a rock star, now almost just a poseur), Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, and Kim Zorn Caputo. And then there’s the website for his new book/film The XXX Project that features portraits of porn stars and essays by various major and minor celebrities. Sex clearly sells.
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Sep 23

People always assume that something like this “The wishes of ordinary Europeans are very similar to those of ordinary Americans. Everybody wants to pay lower taxes and to be subject to fewer regulations. But European governments do not enact their citizens? will. There is less freedom in Europe than in the United States ? and ordinary Europeans are not happy about it!” could only be written by an American. Not so. There is no shortage of people like that in Europe as you can see in this exchange of letters. PS: I don’t have the time or energy to point out all the facts that are actually blatantly wrong in Petr Mach’s letter (like “European governments run the major national media.’ which for most countries I know of is simply wrong - btw, it’s very ironic there’s one country where it’s wrong and true: In Italy, the Prime Minister actually owns the largest TV station…). As you can see, European right-wing ideologues are more or less on the same level as their US counterparts.
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Sep 23

I find Gaylen Morgan’s Floating Worlds most appealing - maybe because I grew up by the sea.
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Sep 22

I really don’t know where this fits in and you’ll only be able to really enjoy this if you understand German. But in any case check out Einstürzende Neubauten frontman Blixa Bargeld reading from the Hornbach catalog - that’s like Nick Cave reading from the Home Depot catalog, say. (seen at swens blog)
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Sep 22

Have a look at Dirk Wilhelmy’s architectural photography.
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Sep 21

“Taking pictures is, in many ways, a kind of performance, and a camera is more like a musical instrument than a paintbrush or a pen. So, looking at a Lartigue print is very much like beholding, say, one of those brilliant child soul singers who come along every so often. You know they can’t possibly have the wisdom that their work suggests, but it doesn’t seem to matter. The miracle of such artists isn’t a question of intuitive technique, for as I say, that’s a contradiction in terms. But neither is it simply an illusion. It’s something altogether astonishing and inexplicable, an expertise beyond experience, and sometimes all you can do is stand back and admire it.” - Jim Lewis in a review of a a book about Jacques Henri Lartigue
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Sep 21

Katharina Bosse has done work on the “new burlesque”. The text on the New Burlesque website, written by some critic, has the following to say: “Her portraits of burlesque dancers, as we will see, reveal a form of sublimated desire underlying this systematic - and ironic - attitude of opposition to established norms, in order to better introduce the disturbing specificity of the photographed subject. New Burlesque thus functions as a system of subverting modernist codes.” Now this is exactly what I thought1 (“Gequirlter Quark wird breit, nicht stark” - J.W.v. Goethe2). 1 That’s irony, of course. Just in case… 2 I don’t know whether Goethe actually said that - my old German teacher claimed he did. Regardless of whether he said it or not it’s my favourite Goethe quote anyway.
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Sep 19

I like Sivan Lewin’s personal work.
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Sep 17

Michael Danner’s projects contain photos from all over the world. Looking for the mundane really has its charms.
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Sep 16

The idea behind Democratic Books is simple: Create a book and allow people to download it (as a pdf file) and assemble it (aka print and glue) themselves. At the time of this writing, they got five books up, amongst those work by Andrew Buurman and David Klammer.
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Sep 16

David Klammer’s website unfortunately is fully accessible for German speakers. Those who don’t understand German can still browse, though - they won’t be able to get the background behind those “Reportage” stories, though.
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Sep 16

One of the finest weblogs has been morphing into a new shape: “consumptive is back. a lot simpler, a lot more blank.” James said that he would “update with something new every week or three - the sort of things you’d see if you were to visit my studio or look through a sketchbook, except that i don’t have a studio or sketchbook. i just have this website.” - and this is what he did. Check it out.
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Sep 7

“There are different kinds of intelligence, and itÂ’s arrogant for a person with one kind of intelligence to question someone with another kind. He [George W Bush] certainly is a master at some things, and he has a following. He seeks strength in simplicity. But, in todayÂ’s world, thatÂ’s often a problem. I donÂ’t think that heÂ’s weak intellectually. I think that he is incurious. ItÂ’s astonishing to me that heÂ’d spend an hour with his incoming Secretary of the Treasury and not ask him a single question. But I think his weakness is a moral weakness. I think he is a bully, and, like all bullies, heÂ’s a coward when confronted with a force that heÂ’s fearful of. His reaction to the extravagant and unbelievably selfish wish list of the wealthy interest groups that put him in the White House is obsequious. The degree of obsequiousness that is involved in saying ‘yes, yes, yes, yes, yesÂ’ to whatever these people want, no matter the damage and harm done to the nation as a whole - that can come only from genuine moral cowardice. I donÂ’t see any other explanation for it, because itÂ’s not a question of principle. The only common denominator is each of the groups has a lot of money that theyÂ’re willing to put in service to his political fortunes and their ferocious and unyielding pursuit of public policies that benefit them at the expense of the nation.” - Al Gore, about George W Bush, in a very interesting article about his current life
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Sep 5

Check out Betsie van der Meer’s “Farm” project.
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Sep 4

Quite a while back, while traveling somewhere in Europe, I picked up a magazine or newspaper, and I saw photos from Andrew Buurman’s Serpentine Swimming Club. I remember I tried finding the photos online afterwards, but I didn’t have any luck. Or maybe I meant to look for them, and I didn’t. In any case, I was delighted to see coincidences [RIP a long time ago - 2009] linking to them the other day.
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Sep 4

“If you want to begin an adventure, do it, and if you need an excuse take your camera.” - Michael Venning Also see this page
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Sep 3

Timothy Archibald’s portfolio contains a series of very nice sets of work. I like the Sunday Afternoon Bingo. And for those people interested in what the Monty Pythons used to call “the naughty bits” there is the photojournalistic The Sex Machines project - photos of and interviews with people who work on building machines to have sex with.
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Sep 3

There is a Monty Python sketch where two ladies are talking with each other while watching TV. One of them says “People on television treat the general public like idiots.” Upon which the other one says “Well we are idiots.” The lady who thinks the public are idiots then goes to prove that at least she is an idiot and, needless to say, that’s when things get truly absurd. The US presidential election this year will be another test of whether the public are idiots.
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Sep 1

Jindrich Streit started photography by documenting life in his home town Sovinec.
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