Archives

August 2007

SELECT A MONTH:

Aug 31

Adam Bartos has documented various topics, such as the Soviet space programme. Read an interview about the space-programme work here. (updated entry)
Read more »

Aug 31

I like Thomas Adank’s minimalist photography.
Read more »

Aug 30

When I looked through Johannes Twielemeier’s photography of the region evacuated for brown coal surface mining, I was reminded of this excellent article about what they call “strip mining”. It’s a long and very sobering read.
Read more »

Aug 30

With Places of no return, Johannes Twielemeier investigates what happens when a whole region is evacuated because of a brown coal surface mine, noting “My pictures show what money can’t buy.”
Read more »

Aug 29

This recollection of ‘Class Time with Gary Winogrand’ is currently making the rounds on photo blogs, and since it’s an interesting read, I thought I’d link to it as well.
Read more »

Aug 29

“Daniel Traub is an American photographer and filmmaker that has been based in China since 1999. As a photographer he has been engaged with long term projects including a body of work entitled Simplified Characters which explores the transformation of China’s cities through street portraits and urban scenes and the large format series City’s Edge which looks at the border region where urban and rural China meet.”
Read more »

Aug 28

I hadn’t followed local politics too much lately, but when my wife and I got stuck in traffic today, we heard about this story, which immediately reminded us of this comedy sketch from one of our favourite comedy shows, Little Britain. Yeah, but no.
Read more »

Aug 28

“U.S. citizens own 270 million of the world’s 875 million known firearms, according to the Small Arms Survey 2007 by the Geneva-based Graduate Institute of International Studies.” (story) - c.f. my review of ‘Armed America’
Read more »

Aug 28

Justin Visnesky’s series sometimes you just know is really quite nice.
Read more »

Aug 28

Yvi Magazine is a new publication from Holland, whose first edition features my conversation with David Maisel, along with many of his photos, reproduced in stunning quality. I don’t know about availability in various parts of the world - check out their website (or contact them).
Read more »

Aug 28

Maybe someone can explain this to me. On the one hand, there are frequent complaints in the fine-art photo community about the (perceived) poor quality of the photography over at Flickr. On the other hand, ‘vernacular photography’ (the kind of stuff that people would have put up on Flickr - had it existed fifty years ago) is becoming ever more popular. I must be missing something.
Read more »

Aug 27

In a recent entry, Michael Shaw discusses the absence of people in the media’s coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: “I suppose the absence of even one soul in either cover is supposed to convey profound loss and disappearance. Still, I find this tendency disconcerting. Just like the lead image from Saturday’s front page story in the LA Times (or the previous TIME cover on the catastrophe, for that matter), we hardly see a sign of life. So, are these images effective for the absence of people, or do they reflect a disaster without a human face?” I wouldn’t know what the editors and writers at the various magazines and newspapers were thinking, but there is another possible explanation, which Simon Norfolk talks about in this excellent interview. Once you include people in a photograph, they “become what the photograph is.” (emphasis in the original interview) Thus, photographing the people who still suffer from the ongoing neglect and mismanagement would exclude those people from the picture - figuratively and literally speaking - who are responsible for that mismanagement (and vice versa).
Read more »

Aug 27

I am a bit torn about Camille Seaman’s photography - it is quite decorative, but there’s also something else that I can’t quite grasp, yet.
Read more »

Aug 27

Nate Mathews’ photography shows us the aspects of modern “architecture” that we might not even be aware of (any longer): Vast areas of concrete, with generic-looking buildings.
Read more »

Aug 25

“a new stained-glass window in Germany’s Cologne Cathedral […] evokes technology and science, not religion and the divine. Contemporary German artist Gerhard Richter designed the 65-foot-tall work to replace the original, destroyed by bombs in World War II. As a starting point, he used his own 1974 painting 4096 Colors.” - story; the window was fully revealed today, more images and a short German text here.
Read more »

Aug 24

I quite like Scott Chandler’s work, especially the Funeral Homes.
Read more »

Aug 24

A little while ago, I came up with a few changes that I wanted to make as far as this blog is concerned, and, having moved hosting and being now set up at my new home, it’s time for the next one. Since I upgraded to a much newer version of Movable Type, I will bring back comments, right underneath posts.
Read more »

Aug 23

Errol Morris’s essay Will the Real Hooded Man Please Stand Up is actually less about photography than about bad or sloppy journalism (and the NY Times, where it’s published, had its fair share of that during the selling of the Iraq war).
Read more »

Aug 23

There’s way too much Photoshop for me in most of Joachim Lapotre’s photos, but the still lifes at the bottom of page 1 I actually like a lot (the pages load very slowly).
Read more »

Aug 21

Pascal Fellonneau’s website contains a whole bunch of interesting photography taken in Iceland.
Read more »

Aug 20

Arja Katariina Hyytiäinen’s portfolio contains quite a lot of good work - and a lot in b/w.
Read more »

Aug 18

I can’t think of a better place and a worse place (at the same time!) as the location for a poster copy of Andreas Gursky’s ‘99 Cents’ than a dollar store - found and photographed by Kristopher Stallworth.
Read more »

Aug 13

Caroline De Vries’ personal work contains a whole bunch of excellent photos.
Read more »

Aug 13

Alison Jackson’s work is a commentary on a culture obsessed with “celebrities”.
Read more »

Aug 12

I am not sure I am all that impressed by what we are being offered as portraiture of famous people these days. More often than not, it seems to me, it’s more important to have some sort of gimmick in the photo - often accompanied by gratuitous Photoshopping, to make the result look like a still from a Disney movie. Make no mistake, there is a time and place for this look - for example, in an ad for Disneyland. But this kind of portraiture has become so common that I’m wondering when people will snap out of it. In a sense, it’s not too different from the portraiture that people loved about one hundred years ago, where a b/w photo would be gaudily hand coloured.
Read more »

Aug 12

David Stephenson’s photographic work has covered diverse subject matters. Also see this page, which has samples of his “Stars” series.
Read more »

Aug 10

Joseph Tripi’s All American City is a great portrait of Buffalo and the Western New York region.
Read more »

Aug 9

No, it’s not what you think. I went to look through the Perspective Distortion pool to look for… well, there’s the problem. I don’t really know what it is I’m looking for (that’s very helpful, isn’t it?), but I figured if it’s somewhere, it might be in that pool. I did find a few photos that almost made my brain hurt, and since you probably won’t believe me, look at this, for example, or at this. And then I also came across this photo, which is quite interesting, because unlike the two other examples it looks almost normal, but something is not quite right.
Read more »

Aug 9

The advantage of the web is that someone always knows how it’s done and is willing to share it. So this page tells you how you can create images like the ones Ina Weissflog did.
Read more »

Aug 9

Most photographers aim at preserving perspective, and we often feel uncomfortable about slight deviations. I’ve often wondered why so few people abandon perspective and, instead, try to show the world in a somewhat different way. Ina Weißflog’s digital constructions are such an attempt, which I find very interesting and refreshing.
Read more »

Aug 9

“The end of the 20th century showed us a growing discussion on the problematics of female body as material for images. In my project [About Girls] I wanted to show girls - repeat girls - not as objects and something desirable, but imperfect and satisfied with themselves at the same time.” - Wilma Hurskainen
Read more »

Aug 8

I know, I know, every day there are species disappearing from this planet, so why make a big fuss about it? But then I can’t help but feel that every once in a while we need to be reminded of how our actions are destroying the living conditions of countless animals and plants and, as is becoming more and more obvious, our own species. Today, I found that the Yangtze river dolphin is now officially extinct.
Read more »

Aug 8

Tatjana Hallbaum’s portfolio contains a whole bunch of different projects, of which I especially like “In-Between” *under “Staged Photography”.
Read more »

Aug 8

That is the question. For an opinion about Flickr that’s about as flawed (for different reasons, though) as Stephen Shore’s bashing of Flickr (see the quote in Alec’s post) check, for example, this post.
Read more »

Aug 7

There is a long article about contemporary photography in Germany’s weekly Die Zeit, which unfortunately you won’t be able to enjoy unless you are able to read German. The article made me realize how different the photography scene in Germany really is. It’s quite instructive to notice how many Germans apparently don’t realize how well some of their photographers are doing internationally. And it’s very refreshing to see how a widely read magazine discusses in such a simple and accepting fashion the use of digital technologies and the changes they brought to photography, without getting mired in either hyping digital technologies or bemoaning violations of photographic orthodoxy. Hopefully, there will be an English translation of the article (I doubt it, though).
Read more »

Aug 7

Part of the reason why moving hosting took a bit longer was that I also wanted to have my own photography updated. I have been working on a couple of new series, and since one is now at a stage where I feel comfortable showing it, my last excuse for not finalizing the hosting switch evaporated. So apart from the new look of the blog (one of the templates that came with MT actually; so for those who emailed me or commented on how good it looks: Thank you for completely overestimating my abilities to make things look good online) there now is Higher Education online - I re-shot the first version of this series (now using film!). Seeing the 20x20 (inches) prints of the photos made me realize that I’ve come a long way from when I started with photography. In any case, the statement for the series is still missing, as is the general “about/bio” stuff - I’ll add that after my move to Northampton, Massachusetts next week (I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to be able to get out of Pittsburgh!).
Read more »

Aug 6

Can you guess what this man invented 25 years ago? Those who are able to read German, can read about it.
Read more »

Aug 6

“In 1971, 23 American college students’ lives were changed by the now notorious Stanford Prison Experiment. For the eminent psychologist responsible, Philip Zimbardo, the parallels to the atrocities at Abu Ghraib are palpable. In an exclusive Australian interview, he joins Natasha Mitchell, to reflect on the capacity in all of us to commit evil. It’s a case of good apples put in bad barrels.” - story
Read more »

Aug 6

There is an interesting exhibition (with quite a bit of background) of East German (GDR) photography here.
Read more »

Aug 6

After covering the war in former Yugoslavia, German photojournalist Wolfgang Bellwinkel has now changed focus. Don’t miss The Global City Project III. (updated entry)
Read more »

Aug 6

Dan Boardman just finished setting up his website - well worth the visit!
Read more »

Aug 5

“Responding to an outcry that included a passionate Internet campaign and a satiric rap video, city officials yesterday backed off proposed new rules that could have forced tourists taking snapshots in Times Square and filmmakers capturing that only-in-New-York street scene to obtain permits and $1 million in liability insurance.” (story)
Read more »

Aug 4

Photography, when taken as a form of art, derives its strength from the fact that a photo might evoke something unique in us. We have been well trained to respond to the photographic language used in the media - regardless of whether we actually feel what we say we feel, but when we deal with photography taken as an art form, we have more freedom. We feel more comfortable to see what it does to us, we feel more comfortable to let it get closer to us.
Read more »

Aug 2

It’s interesting to see how Joachim Brohm’s photography has many similarities with the work of, say, Stephen Shore or Joel Sternfeld and is quite different from what many people think of as “German” photography. (updated entry)
Read more »

Aug 2

Much has been said by and about Tod Papageorge over at Alec’s blog recently, and there is no need for me to add anything to that discussion. Those interested in the photography discussed in that context will probably enjoy reading an essay by Tod Papageorge entitled Walker Evans and Robert Frank: An Essay on Influence, posted over at Eric Etheridge’s site.
Read more »

Aug 1

Over at Todd Deutsch’s blog I found a post about the Luminous Landscape Endowment.
Read more »

Aug 1

At the risk of sounding like a Kulturpessimist, for every technology/invention there will be someone who will turn it into something that is - at best - just annoying (for example telemarketing) or - at worst - outright harmful (for example nuclear weapons). This interesting article discusses “spam” - don’t we all know it?
Read more »

Aug 1

It was a pleasant surprise to find the link to Robin Friend’s photography in my inbox the other day.
Read more »