Archives

September 2011

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Sep 29

“American Weekend is an ongoing project that deals with how We Americans deal with our limited amount of time off at the end of the week and all the nuances that it entails.” - Hollis Bennett
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Sep 28

Am I the only one who finds this really sad? There are so many things one could talk about, in terms of art. But you can be certain that the one thing many people will remember hearing for a while is how a famous gallery is selling - let’s face it: pretty bad - paintings done by a famous singer that look like they’ve been copied off of other people’s photographs.
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Sep 28

Nigel Bennet’s Silence Has an Echo was picked by Michael Mazzeo as one of the winning entries to this years Conscientious Portfolio Competition. Michael wrote: “This portfolio offers enough information and ambiguity to elicit countless narratives. Nevertheless, the mood of the work is certainly unsettling and, I believe, very appropriate given the current state of the world.” I talked with Nigel about the series in an extended conversation that you can find here.
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Sep 28

Nguan’s These Times is street photography in around New York’s Times Square, the “family-friendly neon play land, […] an explicit target for terror attacks,” to use the photographer’s words. Very well seen, very well done.
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Sep 28

Part of the future of photography on the web might be people discussing photography using video. Things really get interesting once you have more than one person, and voila, there’s In the Loupe, where Stella Kramer, Julie Grahame, and Allegra Wilde talk about photography in short video segments (via dvafoto).
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Sep 27

Last Best Hiding Place by Tim Richmond is part of his four-year project End of the Oil (via). Definitely also check out Facade.
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Sep 27

Andrey Ivanov’s Shipwrecked Souls is one of those projects based on a simple idea that just works. I wish there were more images, though.
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Sep 26

The images in Hannah Lucy Jones’ To Happiness, Endlessly were compiled during a trip across England, in the words of the photographer “a diary of what I saw, who I met, and where I went.”
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Sep 26

Right here. Well worth the read, for a variety of reasons.
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Sep 26

“WARCO: The News Game is a first-person shooter video game in which the player is a photojournalist gathering footage for television news stories on subjects similar to revolutionary conflict in Africa and the Middle East.” - Scott Brauer
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Sep 23

It doesn’t happen very often that the first and only thing that really bothers me about a photobook is its cover. But that’s the case with Riley and His Story: Me and My Outrage, You and Us by Monica Haller. You can visit the dedicated microsite and see/decide for yourself. It’s not even that I mind text on the cover. But not this text, on the cover of this book. It’s too bad since the rest of the book is so amazing. In fact, it’s a book that deserves to be seen more widely. (more)
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Sep 23

For those who haven’t seen them, here are the photobook presentations I produced these past two weeks: Landschaft, Waffenruhe, Selbst, Menschenbilder by Michael Schmidt, Joachim Schmid Photoworks 1982-2007, Picture Cook Book (1958) (yes, that is an old cookbook, but you really want to look at it), and three independently produced photobooks, the latter two a first, trying to break out of only presenting books by dedicated/mainstream photobook publishers.
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Sep 22

I really like Natalie Krick’s New Work (which, I suppose, at some stage will get a proper title) - it’s filled with all kinds of details, and the resulting images are visually arresting.
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Sep 22

There are two web photo magazines that I wanted to point out. There’s Landscape Stories (which has been around for a while), and there’s FK Magazine (now in English). Have a peek!
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Sep 21

The panorama isn’t seen very often in art galleries, for, I suppose, a variety of reasons. It’s a very tricky format. Dylan Vitone’s panoramas are assembled from individual photographs, but they’re not digitally stitched. Compelling work that is more complex than it might seem: People might appear more than once so that a story is told; or the curtain might get pulled back, revealing the drama or absurdity of contemporary life. The example above (click to see a larger version) is from Miami (I just had to pick a photo that had something to do with photography itself).
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Sep 20

This is a portraits from Enda Bowe’s Teannalach, a beautiful body of work.
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Sep 19

I find Klea McKenna’s Slow Burn a bit uneven - I like some images way better than others - but I really like the play with the physicality of the object, in this case the negative.
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Sep 19

If you have sixteen minutes, you might want to watch this talk by Hans Aarsman about photography (via). It’s incredibly refreshing and at times very funny.
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Sep 16

Hardly a day goes by without the concern being voiced that there are too many photographs in the world. Earlier this year, I wrote about 60 billion photos on Facebook alone (it must be more by now, but does the number really matter any longer?). I personally don’t think there are too many photos in the world. This is probably because I don’t even know what my benchmark would be. I know what happens when I drink too much coffee or alcohol or eat too much candy, but I yet have to notice any problems when looking at large numbers of photographs. But still. If we get back to the complaint about all those photographs, the first thing we might want to realize is that Joachim Schmid talked about too many photographs in the world before Facebook was born. In 1989, he said “No new photographs until the old ones have been used up!” (quoted from the book I’m going to review here) (more)
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Sep 16

Lots of independently produced books/zines waiting to be bought - definitely worth checking out!
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Sep 16

Marc Feustel has a wonderful interview with Yannick Bouillis, founder of Offprint Paris, “a project space for contemporary photography and a book fair for independent publishers.” A quote that struck me (and that I fully agree with): “The focus on the so-called ‘collectible’ aspect of photobooks, which is reinforced by the endless ‘best photobook’ awards (are there not enough competitions in daily life already?) masks the importance of the photobook within photography.”
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Sep 15

Tom Winchester conducted an interview with the curator of Boris Mikhailov’s Case History at MoMA, which you can find here. It’s a very interesting piece, tackling the various issues around that body of work.
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Sep 15

It is time to reveal the winners of the Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2011. This year, the jury consisted of Caroline von Courten (FOAM Magazine), Michael Mazzeo (Michael Mazzeo Gallery), and myself. Find more information about Caroline and Michael here. Without further ado, the winners are… (more)
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Sep 14

© Lee Friedlander, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco Walking into an exhibition of work by one photographer, and thinking of another is seen by most as a cynical thing, however to walk into a Lee Friedlander exhibition and immediately think of Gary Winogrand’s picture Utah, 1964 seems entirely natural and relevant. (more)
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Sep 14

“The Island is an ongoing project that documents life on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The long and narrow string of barrier islands for many is a vacation destination. For me, it is much more. It is a place where I fell in love, married and hope to one day raise a family. The Island is my connection to a place that like the tide has its highs and lows.” - Tim Gruber
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Sep 12

I remember then when I saw portraits from “Mona Lisas of the suburbs” by Ute Mahler and Werner Mahler for the first time, I was blown away. Seemingly very simple photographs, the portraits reveal enormous depth, while at the same time they are incredibly beautiful. To make a long story short, there had been some plans to make a book, so after some discussions Ute and Werner decided to do it with Meier & Müller, the photobook publishing venture I’m part of. The book is now out (in Europe, US copies are in transit), so I asked the photographers some questions about this very special project - their first together, as a married couple, after each being a photographer for almost forty years. Find the piece here.
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Sep 12

The first Conscientious spin-off book, Conversations with Photographers, Vol. 1, is selling steadily. If you haven’t ordered a copy for yourself now might be a good time to do so!
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Sep 12

“Do people in the latter days of state transition stay connected to a past of which they have no memories and of which the last traces slowly disappear? School nr. 7 is a documentary of the first generation after the Cold War in Bulgaria and depicts growing up in an adolescent society. The country is a place, where the old stereotypes have disappeared, but are not jet replaced by new ones.” - Vesselina Nikolaeva
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Sep 12

“This idea that everything has been done is a sign of the limitations of our own imaginations.” - Colin Pantall And: “More important than knowledge and research is passion and conviction. You need to invest something in what you photograph - the Bechers had a passion for water towers and smelting plants. And it shows, in a good way. Too many people photograph what they think they ought to. That shows too, but in a bad way.”
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Sep 9

These are the photobook presentations I produced over the past couple of weeks: Photo Opportunities by Corinne Vionnet, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Mother by Katharina Bosse, Berlin by Mitch Epstein, and Baghdad Calling by Geert van Kesteren.
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Sep 8

Julie L. Sims’ Uncharted Territory: Anatomy of a Natural Disaster uses natural disasters as metaphors for depression or other psychological disorders.
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Sep 7

I suppose it’s easy to see how Investigations by Dogan Arslanoglu fits into many of the current debates about contemporary photography and its use of images.
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Sep 6

Maarten Boswijk’s Eventually portrays Bulgarian Black Sea resorts that aren’t quite making it (yet?).
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Sep 5

I’m happy to announce a new book by Meier & Müller, the photobook publishing house I’m part of: Monalisen der Vorstädte (“Mona Lisas of the Suburbs”), a project by Ute and Werner Mahler. It’s their first collaborative project and a gem of a book for anyone interested in portraiture. The book is now on sale in Europe, at the time of this writing the copies for the US market are in transit (US sales should start at the end of this month - I’ll make an announcement).
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Sep 5

This is a spread from Marina Weigl’s Horse and I. Those with a sense of humour might also enjoy her Class of 2009.
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Sep 5

I have long been thinking about the art of the remix and about seeing it applied to photography. But how would remixing a photobook actually work? I had to figure it out this Summer when a friend of mine, Bruce Haley, sent me his latest book, Sunder, to have it remixed. Find the details here.
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Sep 2

Many (most?) touristic activities are cultural compulsions. You do certain thing because that’s what one does when going to wherever it might be you went, not necessarily because you want to. Or maybe you think you want to. After all, wouldn’t it be great to go to New York City and see Times Square? Actually, can you even go to New York and not go to Times Square? What will your friends and neighbours say if you tell them you didn’t go? Everybody goes to Times Square! Of course, part of the ritual is to take a photograph. After all, you need proof that you were there. Or maybe proof isn’t the right word. In any case, the activity of going to Time Square inevitably involves taking a photo - and the same is true for all other such locations, whether it’s the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin or whatever else. (more)
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Sep 2

If you have ever been to Berlin you know about the city’s strange allure: It is inevitable that you know many things about it, things that you wouldn’t know about any other city. So you travel there filled with excitement and some apprehension maybe. Once you’re there the contemporary city, a charming mix of buildings and people, seemingly thrown together at random, with no real planning behind it, will overwhelm your senses. (more)
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Sep 1

“I had heard about the mummies of Guanajuato in Mexico, mummified cholera victims from the 1830’s.” writes Steve Pyke. Find his account of getting access to and photographing them here.
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