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Contemporary German Photography

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Apr 9, 2013

Fabian Rook’s Desktop Evidence combines Google Street View, with the occasional photournalistic material added or locations changed after the fact.
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Mar 5, 2013

With The Secret World of Fraternities, Lene Münch portrays German (student) organizations whose mindset never made it out of the 19th century.
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Jan 16, 2013

Terminal, a visit to Tel Aviv’s old bus station, is Tobias Kruse’s contribution to Ostkreuz Agency’s Über Grenzen/On Borders.
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Dec 17, 2012

“All I really knew when I started this project was that I wanted to photograph in my father’s town of birth. For years I had thought about documenting life in Iowa. I flew over, got a rental car and started driving around. This place, where I had been so many times since my childhood, felt different now while looking through a viewfinder.” - Kevin Mertens, introducing Hurtland
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Nov 27, 2012

In Take Me, Dana Stölzgen combines single photographs with diptychs and, occasionally, text.
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Aug 22, 2012

Thorsten Brinkmann produces his photographs using trash collected in the street. I especially enjoy the sense of humour that runs as a thread throughout this work.
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Jul 18, 2012

This is an image from Michael Lämmler’s often cryptic and occasionally comical Death Star.
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May 30, 2012

Yannik Willing’s Roadside portray Norwegian landscapes along with man-made constructions (typically infrastructure) placed inside them - our contemporary experience of landscape.
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May 14, 2012

Paula Winkler’s Exceptional Encounters contains portraits of men found through internet sex forums. (via)
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Apr 23, 2012

What do clubs and small concert venues look like when people are gone and you switch on the lights? André-Alexander Giesemann shows us with Vom Bleiben (Staying Behind).
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Mar 8, 2012

There are still photographer who are hard to find online. Ulrike Kolb is one of them. I really like Göran Gnaudschun’s introduction of her and her work (unfortunately in German only, but have a peek to see the photographs).
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Mar 6, 2012

“Weimar-West, the city quarter built in the 80’s and isolated from the rest of the idyllic cultural city of Weimar, faces challenges like a high level of unemployment, an aging population, conflicts between foreigners and neo-Nazis and a poor image. […] There is not much for the kids to do here. But, between the high-rises, the shopping center and the sparsely planted landscaping known as ‘Paradise’, they have found nooks and crannies where they can hang out together.” - Nathalie Mohadjer about Weimar Paradies
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Feb 23, 2012

Nikita Kakowsi’s Deutschland is a rather drab and disheartening place.
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Feb 16, 2012

Christian Kryl’s Top of the World shows wealthy people enjoying themselves in the posh Swiss resort town St. Moritz.
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Feb 13, 2012

You might be wondering why this is an interesting image. Thing is the original version is an animated gif from Marcel Meyer’s My Favourite Childhood Nightmares. I’m slightly torn here, after a while I clicked to the next image basically only looking for where it moved - but it’s well done, and I’m sure we’ll see more work like this in the future.
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Jan 24, 2012

This is what one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the lighthouse of Alexandria looks like today - or more accurately, this is what the scene looks like, since it’s gone. Find the rest of the wonders in Hans Engels’ The Seven Wonders.
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Jan 18, 2012

Ralf Brück’s Distortion contains quite a few very interesting images. Not all of them work for me, but the ones that do are very successful.
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Oct 27, 2011

I suppose it’s easiest to think of the young women who contort themselves as part of their warm-up routine in M. Schwarzer’s Garde & Mariechen as folk cheerleaders. If you want to know more about this and see some in action have a look at this video (which, I must warn you, you will not be able to unsee) or this video (basically a mix of Toddlers & Tiaras and the Can Can, start watching at 1min00 in).
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Oct 11, 2011

This is an image from Paula Markert’s wonderful Die Verhältnisse, dealing with family life and relationships in ways that I’ve rarely seen. Unfortunately, there is no English translation for the quotes used throughout the piece.
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Sep 5, 2011

This is a spread from Marina Weigl’s Horse and I. Those with a sense of humour might also enjoy her Class of 2009.
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Aug 3, 2011

I don’t know whether Liverpool by Eric Meier is most necessarily his most representative work, but it simply interests me the most.
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Aug 2, 2011

Bigi Möhrle’s Alp - about a farm, making cheese, in the Alps - is almost a bit too idyllic. Beautiful. (via)
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Jun 27, 2011

Beyond by Loredana Nemes portrays the world inside Turkish and Arab men-only cafes in Berlin - from the outside. The photographer is barred from entering.
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May 30, 2011

“On the biggest cemetery of Europe in Hamburg up to 1.7 million people are buried. This cemetery is more than a burial ground. It is a mystic place of the grief and the stop, as well as a workplace for numerous people who have to deal with the death every day.” - Jan-Christoph Hartung about his Memento Mori
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Apr 20, 2011

Nina Röder’s Teresia photographically reconstructs scenes from the photographer’s grandmother’s life (who had been expelled from her home at the end of World War II).
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Apr 4, 2011

“Is nature behaving correctly?” - Clemens Bechmann (via)
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Mar 26, 2011

With DL07 stereotypes of war, a photographic investigation, Jens Liebchen investigates the visual language of photojournalism covering war.
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Mar 15, 2011

Christian Tiefensee’s Refugium (pdf download) mixes photography from different sources - his own images plus found ones - to create a body of work that centers on the idea of, well, refuge.
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Feb 15, 2011

This is a photo from Simone Rosenbauer’s borderline overwhelming Small Museum (104 photos!).
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Feb 9, 2011

I quite like Jennifer Braun’s Irgendwo. I wish there were more images, it’s a very poetic series (even though it is somewhat marred by the - German-language only - statement). (via)
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Feb 3, 2011

“I follow the traces of art made in the former GDR. On the one hand I take photographs of the blank spaces in rooms or on the walls or facades that were appeared when pictures were taken away or painted over after the cultural and political turn in 1989. On the other hand I visit archives or storages where images with an uncertain future are stored or forgotten.” - Margret Hoppe about her Vanishing Images
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Jan 31, 2011

Christine Bachmann’s Undine Geht contains portraits of women, based on a novella by Austrian writer Ingeborg Bachmann. (via)
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Dec 13, 2010

Mirko Martin’s L.A. Crash slyly mixes factual and fictional elements to create a view of L.A. that is as fake as the city’s image itself.
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Nov 22, 2010

For her series The time in between, Helena Schätzle visited locations her own grandfather had been to in 1945/46, to photograph the landscape and the older generation living there. (thank you, Lia!)
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Nov 17, 2010

Peter of Sonic Blog fame just published a list of German photographers looking at Germany, what it means to be German, or other aspects of their own country. Have a peek!
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Nov 4, 2010

I’m always a little bit surprised how few German photographers explore what being German might mean. This is especially surprising in the light of both German history and what’s going on in the country (there’s a very large pool of immigrants, for example). In fact, there are probably more German photographers who went to the US taking photos of cowboys than artists turning their lenses towards their own country. And when the lens is turned that way, there are no people (one could argue that the Düsseldorf School is basically completely apolitical). So I was glad to find Marita Bullmann’s Es gibt immer was zu tun [There’s always something to do] (here) today. I’d like to see more like that.
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Nov 1, 2010

This image is from Frank Gaudlitz’s Casa Mare, which features interiors and portraits taken in southern and central Eastern Europe. Beautiful work.
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Oct 27, 2010

Carina Linge’s work is very conceptual, and unfortunately, all the text (apart from the menu titles) is only in German. But check out the projects anyway, it’s an interesting mix of images.
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Sep 30, 2010

Peter Freitag’s “collages of ‘Private Stages’ take amateur photographs of nudes from the Internet and undermine the original intention of the images through a simple process of interference.” Brilliant! And the rest of his work is as good as this. (via)
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Sep 2, 2010

Jörn Vanhöfen’s Detroit (pdf) is still work in progress, and I’m looking forward to seeing the final result. I do like the presentation in the pdf quite a bit.
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Aug 25, 2010

The story of Detroit is well known, the story of East German cities hemorrhaging people less so. Nico Baumgarten’s the time has come, get me out of here portrays Dessau, in the 1920s the city of the Bauhaus.
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Aug 11, 2010

Karsten Kronas’ “photo series tells of Beyo?lu, one of the many diverse and contrast-rich urban milieus in the metropolis of Istanbul. […] Kronas’ photo series focuses on the transgender scene in Beyo?lu, mostly showing prostitutes who are part of the transsexual subculture. Their ambiguous bodies are set against the geographic patterns of the city.” (source)
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Aug 9, 2010

Oliver Farrnbacher’s Andacht (here: a mix between prayer and reverence) pairs images taken in churches with images taken in the woods. Notes the photographer: “For this [Andacht - JMC] you need a quiet place that has an atmosphere of solitude and ‘holyness’, and for me there are two such places: churches and forests.” (via)
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Aug 4, 2010

Thomas Wieland’s Neuperlach portrays the drab Munich suburb. (via)
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Jul 27, 2010

After the Wall came down, many of East Germany’s “guest workers” (to use the West German term) had to go back home. There were around 16,000 such workers from Mozambique. East Germany had sent money to the government of Mozambique - the former workers haven’t seen any of it, and most are living in poverty now. This is the subject of Malte Wandel’s Einheit, Arbeit, Wachsamkeit. Unfortunately, the text and interviews are in German only.
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Jul 26, 2010

Ulrike Brückner’s space for uses images found on the web. But instead of using them as is, the artist places the people into a neutral environment - thus creating one of the best such projects I’ve seen in a long time.
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Jul 20, 2010

This photo looks like some sort of conceptual photo piece (think something coming out of Rietveld Academie). It isn’t. It’s not staged. It’s part of Uwe H. Martin’s series about narcolepsy. The woman in the photo, Lisa, suffered from an episode of cataplexy, “a condition whereby the sufferer or cataleptic experiences a total loss of muscle control and postural tone.” Martin quotes Lisa as saying “I had a full cataplexy in Aarau. I was lying on the street, not being able to talk or act. For other people it looks as if I am unconsciousness [sic!] and many just stare or walk by. Someone just pushed me a bit with his shoe. Well you need to be careful - it could be something poisonous on this woman.” After making sure that everything was in fact OK, Martin asked her whether he could take a photo (she was able to blink - once for yes, twice for no), and she said he could (see this interview, unfortunately only in German).
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Jul 19, 2010

Verena Brandt’s Villa Germania portrays German expats, most of them retirees, living in a town in Thailand.
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Jul 14, 2010

Michael Frahm describes the images in his The Exercise of Look and Fail to See as “cinematographic portraits” of the subjects’ “personality in apparently complete isolation.”
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Jun 29, 2010

Dawin Meckel’s portrait of Detroit is by far the best I’ve seen so far. Instead of focusing on ruins, Dawin went to include a much wider view, and he took photos of people living in Detroit. You can probably still debate whether his is the “true” Detroit (who is to say really?), but I wager nobody will think of “ruin porn”.
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