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Contemporary German Photography

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Jun 17, 2010

“Between then and now is a documentary project about people and places from a vanishing world. This vanishing world is situated in the Bavarian Forest, which is characterized by its rural structure and which is undergoing massive shifts from a traditional to a modern society.” - Evi Lemberger
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Apr 29, 2010

Tim Hölscher’s Tankstellen are 1950s gas stations, digitally re-set to their original states. Equally noteworthy: Peisazhet e Shqiperise, photographs taken with some of the ubiquitous Albanian bunkers the earlier Communist regimes littered the landscape with - the artist converted them into pin-hole cameras.
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Apr 26, 2010

Sebastian Keitel’s home is a typology of very improvised living quarters of Vietnamese migrant workers.
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Apr 26, 2010

Delia Keller’s work has a very cinematic feel to it, even when showing places as unglamourous as a class room.
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Mar 25, 2010

Katrin Kamrau’s Flämisches Fragment (download the pdf to see the work) is based on Flemish paintings and on the fact that since the time Flemish masterpiece paintings were made, we have lost our ideas of what plants (or fruit) might mean when used in pieces of art.
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Mar 23, 2010

Friederike Brandenburg’s photography centers on landscape photography, and even though there doesn’t appear to be any text you can easily figure out what is going on in the different bodies of work on her site. Beautiful work!
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Mar 17, 2010

When linking to Hanna Witte’s Nacht.Leben [“Night Life”], Peter Feldhaus noted that the work looked “very clean.” And he’s right, things are a bit too slick, a bit too commercial looking for my taste, but the series is nice nevertheless.
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Mar 15, 2010

Andrea Engelke’s Ohrenbetäubende Stille [deafening silence] portrays people suffering from chronic pain.
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Mar 3, 2010

“If Andre LeNotre, the architect of the gardens of Vaux le Vicomte and Versailles would present a design for a garden today, he would most certainly do this with form.z or any other 3-D graphic software. Detailed studies of the various elements might look like these pictures.” - Jürgen Bergbauer (via)
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Mar 2, 2010

Daniel Schumann’s Elisabeth und Wilhelm is a portrait of his grandparents. His grandmother died while he was away, and his grandfather is now suffering from dementia. The combination of portraiture and photography found in family albums creates a compelling project.
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Feb 4, 2010

“Between 1995 and 2007 more than 200,000 farmers committed suicide in India. […] In my view, this is an act of helplessness in a state of momentary despair: a call to society for help. Help not only for the farmer’s immediate family members - widowed wife, old and ailing parents, young children, but also for farming in general and for other farmers, like him.” - Verena Hanschke/Floriana Gavriel (thanks, Hugh!)
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Feb 2, 2010

Ulrich Gebert is one of those German photographers who are so conceptual that they don’t even have a website (or whose website is so obscure that I can’t find it). Regardless, even though very conceptual photography sometimes is a bit hard to digest, when well done - as it is in his case - it can be an incredibly rewarding experience. His current show at Winkleman Gallery is still up until February 13, 2010, so if you’re in New York here’s your chance to see the artist’s work. Everybody else might have to be happy with only seeing this pdf portfolio (which is quite nice actually).
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Feb 1, 2010

Melanie Vogel’s Jitter intentionally uses digital artifacts in the work. I’ve always wondered why photographers don’t do this more - might this be the digital equivalent of film toy-camera photography?
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Jan 26, 2010

Christian Hagemann’s In your face, God! appeals to the astronomer and critic in me: It shows crumpled images of cosmic objects, in which the flash-light reflections from the creases and crinkles look just like stars.
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Jan 21, 2010

When I’m in the car with my wife and we come across a pile of dirt or rubble or sand (or anything likes that), she likes to tease me by pointing out that there is a great photo opportunity. It is true that there are quite a few (male) photographers who have whole portfolios of these kinds of piles, such as Nils Kilnger (found today at Hippolyte Bayard). The website is in German only, but you can probably find your way around. The “Fields” are very nice, btw (even though the images on the website are a bit too small to do the photographs any justice).
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Jan 18, 2010

Sebastian Mölleken’s A40 portrays Germany’s Ruhr region along the A40 highway, using landscapes and portraits. Very impressive work!
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Jan 14, 2010

Colourizing b/w photographs is nothing new (behind me, on my book shelve, there’s a colourized tintype from the late 1800s), but you don’t see it that much any more these days. Florian Merkel has a portfolio of such work, with some rather beautiful images.
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Jan 13, 2010

Klaus Muenzner’s What’s Left Behind shows the Eastern German countryside, 20 years after the reunification. Also not to be missed: Homeless.
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Jan 11, 2010

Ute Friederike Schernau’s All About Eve (and Adam) examines the roles played (and supposed to be played) by women and men.
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Jan 11, 2010

About his einer Fred Hüning writes: “Pictures of my work ‘einer / the one’ tell a story of love. Also of the wish for a child together and of a mother´s permanent fear - on the basis of her own previous experiences - to lose this planned child again. And eventually a story of a painful 30 hour birth of a healthy child.”
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Dec 23, 2009

Daniel Barthmann’s “St. Pauli”, a part of Hamburg (in)famous for its red-light district.
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Dec 14, 2009

Malwine Rafalski’s Holon portrays people (and their environments) who moved back to Nature (c.f. Thoreau’s Walden).
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Dec 10, 2009

And another wonderful find by Peter: Rebecca Sampson’s portraits taken at an eating-disorder treatment center (“Aussehnsucht”). Very moving work, beautifully shot.
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Dec 8, 2009

The above image is from a photo project Torben Weiss shot in a psychiatric unit. Unfortunately, the website only has a few photos for each project (maybe there aren’t more?).
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Dec 3, 2009

Just a few weeks ago, the 20th anniversary of the Berlin Wall opening was celebrated, and we were subjected to the usual imagery again - mostly from the first few days. Norbert Enker’s Grenzfall has images taken over a much longer period of time (180 of them!), which show the Wall coming down/disappearing.
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Dec 3, 2009

Frank Schirrmeister’s Plain City shows us not only a Berlin (mostly) devoid of people, but also stays clear of the usual Berlin photo cliches.
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Dec 3, 2009

I rarely link to abstract photography, but Markus Bruckner’s is well worth the visit.
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Nov 9, 2009

It’s obvious what Heinrich Holtgreve’s Backstage is all about, and it’s not a pretty sight (the places, not the photos).
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Nov 5, 2009

I have no idea what Frank Höhle’s portraits mean, but they’re very well done - one of those cases where you wish you’d get a bit of background on the website. (via)
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Oct 22, 2009

Via thingsmagazine I found Martin Roemers’ photographs of Relics of the Cold War.
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Oct 5, 2009

Patrik Budenz’s Post Mortem (which is not for the queasy!) contains some, well, stunning imagery.
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Sep 17, 2009

There is no information about the series eo ipso on Lia Darjes’ website - so it’s up to us to make something of it.
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Sep 7, 2009

Stefan Hobmaier’s Dorfjugend portrays the lives of young people in small villages.
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Aug 26, 2009

Valerie Schmidt’s focus is on portraiture - a lot of good work, plus some that one could do without. The site is well worth the visit. (via)
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Aug 18, 2009

For those people craving to see typologies, here are Beatrix Reinhardt’s Coca Cola Houses in India. (via)
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Jul 29, 2009

Georg Küttinger’s landscapes:remixed is a fine example of how digital image technologies can be used in very creative ways. (via)
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Jul 15, 2009

For her photography of German nuclear reactors, Anja Behrens uses very classical landscapes - works wonderfully (via)
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Jul 8, 2009

Frederike Wetzels’s “Hoeschviertel” shows what many Germans cities look like, once you get away from the centers and regardless of whether you are in Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich, or wherever else. (thanks, Tobias!)
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Jul 7, 2009

For the fans of typologies there now is Stefan Klink’s project Architecture of train stations in the Harz region (German language only page; but you don’t really need the text). It’s slightly amusing to see that some photography now seems to follow a pattern known from academia: Researchers focusing on some tiny aspect of a much larger field…
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Jun 30, 2009

This photo is not particularly representative of Kai-Uwe Schulte-Bunert’s work, but it shows a different side of a German photographer who sometimes seems to get a little bit lost in formalism.
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Jun 29, 2009

Jonas Holthaus’ Heimat-Raum shows Turkish tea rooms and entertainment centers in Germany.
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Jun 23, 2009

Those interested in architectural photography can find a lot of good images on Christoph Morlinghaus’s website.
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May 25, 2009

Found via The Sonic Blog: Gordon Welters’ documentary photography.
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May 20, 2009

“Anna Lehmann-Brauns discovers and invents spaces in which times seems to stand still, spaces ilike islands in a society moving ever faster, forgotten by the functional dynamics of the world outside. Time standing still opens up the pictures to a sensation of both timelessness and irreality.” (source)
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May 12, 2009

Jan Stradtmann’s Gardon of Eden might be the first financial-crisis photography I’ve seen that’s a bit more than just cliche photos of desperate brokers at the stock exchange.
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Apr 28, 2009

Typologies meet Andreas Gefeller in Jürgen Chill’s “Zellen” (“prison cells”). Find an interview with Jürgen over at Prison Photography.
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Apr 15, 2009

According to his website, Dietmar Busse “is currently working on his next book project, for which he asks people with great individual style to put on their best clothes and come to his Manhattan studio to have their portrait taken.”
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Apr 7, 2009

Tine Casper’s Parents-In-Law are self portraits with (a) parent(s) of the artist’s former partners.
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Apr 2, 2009

Twenty years ago, the Berlin Wall came down (or actually was opened), resulting in the eventual (and surprisingly quick) creation of a unified Germany, which looks and behaves like a slightly larger West Germany. Dorothee Deiss’ “As If Nothing Happened” looks for traces of the Berlin Wall - of which not much remains - by taking photographs of where it once stood and by talking to people who lived in its vicinity. Dorothee showed me the dummy of her book - for the portraits you need to be able to read what the portrayed had to say - and I hope she will be able to find a publisher for it. It’s about time we got some German Vergangenheitsbewältigung (dealing with the past) that goes beyond self-congratulatory speeches by utterly mediocre politicians.
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Mar 10, 2009

Fritz Fabert’s Archäologie der Arbeit [Archeology of Work] presents “relics” from closed down businesses and hospitals. It’s such a simple idea, it works so well, and it’s such a fine alternative to giving the world yet another series of abandoned buildings (seriously, we’ve had more than enough of those!).
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