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Aug 18, 2008

Night-time photography is technically very challenging. However, the mere fact that it is hard to do does not automatically translate into interesting imagery (compare what I wrote about when the medium becomes the message), which is why I rarely link to such work. When I came across Will Govus’ work I noted his creative use of light in many (but not in all) of his photographs, which lends those photographs a certain mystique and tension.
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Aug 13, 2008

“It is personal issues that makes me do what I do, for I have been raped more than 50 times by just listening to what women who have confessed and confirmed their love for other women have been through.” - Zanele Muholi (source of quote)
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Aug 12, 2008

For me, Days With My Father, Phillip Toledano’s moving portrayal of his father’s struggle with life with no short-term memory, easily surpasses any of Phillip’s other work. It’s interesting how this mirrors Richard Avedon’s amazing portraiture of his ailing father (which is vastly better than Avedon’s often extremely gimmicky commercial work).
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Aug 12, 2008

Andres Marroquin Winkelmann’s “Conditions” very successfully mixes portraits (some very staged) with still lifes to convey its message.
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Aug 8, 2008

Evan Baden’s “Illuminati” takes an approach seen in some series on video-game players and successfully adapts it to a wider setting.
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Aug 7, 2008

Most people probably know Aaron Schuman as the man behind the fantastic Seesaw Magazine; his own photography might be less well known. It’s time to change that - have a look at his new series Once Upon A Time In The West, for example.
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Aug 6, 2008

“There are hundreds of ethnic groups in Nigeria, each with its own language and traditions. Among other things which are part of these traditions are various hairstyles. These are determined by the social position of the family, and the artistic talent of the hair stylist. Among them there are special hairstyles for ceremonies such as circumcisions, a woman’s becoming an adult, or the celebration of a marriage. Today it is difficult to trace the background of certain hairstyles because various ethnic groups have mixed together, and adapted to modern culture. Many hairstyles have died out, taking their secrets to the grave with them. Since 1968 Ojeikere (b. Nigeria, 1930) has been making photographs of various hairstyles he sees on the street or at work, or at celebrations. He always asks his models where the hairstyle they are wearing comes from, what its meaning is, its name, and its history.” (source) See some of the photos here, and note the similarities in style and intent with the Bechers’ work.
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Aug 6, 2008

“Born in 1978 in Lagos, Nigeria, Andrew Oghenerukewe Esiebo first came into contact with photography through his foster father, Joseph Esiebo. He began to take photographs after he got his first camera as a gift from a friend, Jose Maria Ortuno and through consistent practice and tutelage from US-based photographer Paul Udstrand, Andrew is now one of Nigeria’s young and illustrious photojournalists, working on portraits of urban life with his country’s culture and heritage as its background.” (source) See lots of photos here, some more here, one of his articles here; and you can see images by members of his Black Box collective here.
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Aug 5, 2008

“I am a photographer using photography as an art form and a major medium of expression. My works address social issues and tends to compliment the act of humanity.” - Emeka Okereke (also have a look at the Bagamoyo blog)
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Aug 4, 2008

“Guy Tillim is one of South Africa’s foremost contemporary photographers. Learning his trade as photojournalist nearly two decades ago, Tillim’s oeuvre has proven to be far more than that of orthodox reportage. His photographs have become increasingly recontextualised as art object within the space of the artbook and gallery.” (source)
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Aug 1, 2008

“Samuel Fosso is one of Africa’s most eminent photographers. […] Fosso started taking self-portraits using up exposures on his films - to send to his mother in Nigeria, whom he had left behind as a refugee fleeing the Biafran war in the late 1960s. Although his initial aim was to show he was alive and well, his interest in exploring the genre grew steadily, and he experimented with new techniques and poses. […] His local community remains unaware of Fosso’s success, a situation Fosso is keen to maintain. He is happy to keep his costumes out of sight and continue his passport and portrait photography business. His neighbours assume he travels to Europe to take wedding photos.” (source)
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Jul 31, 2008

“One of the most respected photographers of the [South African] struggle years, when he was a member of the Afrapix collective and a photographer on the newspaper New Nation, Santu Mofokeng’s black and white photographs provide enduring images of great humanity, recording not only the harshness but also the moments of happiness, and the unquenchable human spirit which kept people going through those times.” (source) Also see this page and this one.
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Jul 31, 2008

“Seydou Keïta (1921-2001) was a self-taught portrait photographer from Bamako, Mali. […] As a self-trained photographer, Keïta always preferred the direct control that black and white studio portraits afforded. From 1949 to 1964, he developed a remarkable reputation; meticulously creating and preserving thousands of exceptional photographs.” (source) More samples here.
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Jul 30, 2008

Over at 2point8, Michael presents a very nice article about “street photography”.
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Jul 30, 2008

“If Malick Sidibés images emanate so much power, it is because beyond the convivial and careless atmosphere he also illustrates the difficulty of having to adapt to life in the city. The confrontation with unemployment and alcohol, the irresistible desire to be like young whites. The pictures reflect the artist: convivial, intimate and yet not voyeuristic, they tell of a great complicity between the artist and his subjects. […] Malick Sidibé got the Hasselblad Award, the golden Lion at the Venice Biennale and lately the ICP award for lifetime achievement.” (source, with many photos to look at). Also see this page, this one, and find an interview here.
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Jul 25, 2008

“Using a digital video camera set to still mode, the artist takes multiple zoomed-in shots of specific locations in his native Israel, methodically documenting every aspect of the space in a way that mimics how a viewer absorbs information upon entering a room. He then combines these images into a large-scale composite that contains more information than a single shot ever could.” While Yuval Yairi’s method is neither new, nor particularly revolutionary, some of the results are very interesting.
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Jul 10, 2008

“Week by week, a township, once at the center of a farming expanse, is steadily loosing ground to the exploding metropolis known as the ‘greater Phoenix area’. Two-lane, dirt-shouldered, rough paved roads with names like Ellsworth, Ray, or Pecos are being widened and annexed by entrance drives to bedroom communities with promising names like ‘Heritage Springs’ or ‘Sunset Haven’. […] vast lots of land, along with their history are loosing the battle against a homogenous America. These photographs of Higley and the surrounding towns of Gilbert, Chandler and Queen Creek are an on-going documentation of this micro-cosmos of globalization.” - Andrew Phelps
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Jul 9, 2008

Maxim Ryazansky’s Pursuit of Happiness is quite excellent.
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Jul 8, 2008

Via we can’t paint I came across the work of Alain Paiement, whose work is similar to what Andreas Gefeller’s Supervisions.
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Jul 4, 2008

I am a bit torn about Bryan Lear’s portfolio, but it contains some very nice images that make his site worth the visit.
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Jul 3, 2008

“I have photographed a group of girls, between the ages of ten and twenty, who are involved in a secret society known as Job’s Daughters. The girls are the direct blood relatives of Master Masons and the group is the only Masonic Youth organization to require this blood relationship.” - Alison Malone
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Jun 27, 2008

Have a look at Mathew Scott’s portfolio!
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Jun 26, 2008

Ethan Levitas’s “Untitled/This is just to say” uses the view from and to subway cars to create portraits of people in the public space.
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Jun 24, 2008

“For most people, photographing something that isn’t there might be tough. Not so for Trevor Paglen. His shots of 189 secret spy satellites are the subject of a new exhibit — despite the fact that, officially speaking, the satellites don’t exist. […] Satellites are just the latest in Paglen’s photography of supposedly nonexistent subjects. To date, he’s snapped haunting images of various military sites in the Nevada deserts, torture taxis (private planes that whisk people off to secret prisons without judicial oversight) and uniform patches from various top-secret military programs.” (source)
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Jun 19, 2008

Mrs Deane linked to Gaston Zvi Ickowicz’s work the other day and discussed the imagery and intentions of the photographer a little bit, with the focus being on “neutrality”. This immediately had me wonder whether neutrality is something an artist should strive for? Is art about being “fair and balanced”?
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Jun 19, 2008

I like Jennifer Boomer’s photography from Alaska (certainly not an overphotographed place!). For those interested, she made a little zine with those photographs that you can purchase here.
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Jun 18, 2008

Nadia Sablin’s photography from the former Soviet Union is a bit of a mixed bag, but well worth the visit.
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Jun 11, 2008

Check out Anthony Blasko’s work!
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Jun 10, 2008

I’m a bit torn about Natasha Kaser’s Customs Of The Country, but I quite like Antiquities.
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Jun 9, 2008

Steffanie Halley’s portraiture focuses on young women. There are some unexpected gems in her portfolio, so make sure to look through all the photos.
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Jun 5, 2008

Gilda Davidian’s portfolio contains a whole bunch of very nice portraiture.
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Jun 4, 2008

I just came across Ben Handzo, and I really like his Youth Protection.
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May 30, 2008

Over at we can’t paint I found the photography of Karly Wildenhaus whose “Interference” very beautifully expands the standard limits of photography.
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May 28, 2008

Anastasia Cazabon’s “Stories” “center around the loss of childhood innocence”.
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May 23, 2008

Bradley Peters is one of this year’s graduates at Yale. I like how his work combines a staged aesthetic (that we have come to see so much coming from Yale) with a kind of spontaneous, snapshot look.
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May 22, 2008

I really like Hank Willis Thomas’ work, especially “Unbranded”, which shows images taken from ads specifically addressed at African Americans, with all text and logos removed. In contrast, the “Branded” series I find a bit too obvious (not that that’s necessarily a bad thing). Hank’s work was part of Leslie Martin’s “Ubiquitous Image” at the recent NY Photo Festival; and you can also find a lot about his work over at Nina’s blog.
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May 21, 2008

I recently discovered Jeff Olson’s moody “North Woods” series.
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May 20, 2008

The web doesn’t do Victoria Sambunaris’ landscapes much justice - as prints, the possess a tremendous, yet subtle beauty.
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May 16, 2008

Even though Samantha Contis has a lot of good portraiture on her website, I actually like her landscapes better.
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May 15, 2008

Elizabeth Fleming’s “Life is a series of small moments” is a photographic portrayal of her own family life. She also maintains a blog that can be found here.
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May 14, 2008

Dina Kantor’s “Finnish & Jewish” is a wonderful project.
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May 9, 2008

There’s a lot of good portraiture on Carmen Winant’s site.
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May 7, 2008

Marian Drew’s Australiana still lifes are hauntingly beautiful and somewhat unsettling at the same time. Also see this site for slightly larger samples.
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May 6, 2008

Hee Jin Kang’s “Sandy’s Deli” is an exploration of her parents’ deli and, by extension, of her family history (her family immigrated to America when she was three years old).
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May 2, 2008

I’m quite interested in how digital technologies can be used to create new imagery (and by that I do not mean creating androids out of people who already wear too much make-up already to splash them on magazine covers), and a little while ago, Ed Winkleman was kind enough to introduce me to Rory Donaldson, whose work he is now showing at his gallery. If you have the chance to see the show, you should check it out, the samples available online cannot convey the effect Rory is able to achieve.
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May 2, 2008

Adi Lavy’s Camp Sundown shows the lives of children allergic to light - a condition called XP - at a Summer camp, where they can meet to interact in larger groups. Photographically, a nightmare project: There is almost no light available.
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Apr 22, 2008

There’s a whole bunch of nice images in Drew Kelly’s “Explorations”.
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Apr 17, 2008

Occasionally, I come across a photographer who I think I surely linked to in the past, and then I find I didn’t (which always puzzles me). Richard Barnes is one of them. I really like his work.
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Apr 16, 2008

I am a bit torn about Jeffrey Gray Brandsted’s work, but there are enough good images to make his website worth the visit.
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Apr 15, 2008

Check out the photography of Scott Patrick Wiener.
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