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Mar 6, 2007

Yeondoo Jung’s series “Wonderland” stages childrens’ drawings. “Bewitched” is equally nice.
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Mar 6, 2007

An-My Lê war photography shows re- or pre-enacted wars, and, it is claimed, by “bringing added resonance to the phrase ‘the theater of war,’ Lê asks us to reconsider the fictions that cloud the ways in which war is experienced, remembered, and represented.” (source) Find a podcast with the artist here.
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Feb 26, 2007

Since I first linked to him, Anthony Goicolea has added a lot of new (and interesting) work to his website. (updated entry)
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Feb 26, 2007

Nancy Davenport presents us with a carefully manipulated world where at first the unusual (or unsettling) often is not obvious at all.
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Feb 22, 2007

If someone had shown me Michele Abeles’ portraits not telling me anything about them I would have guessed they were shot by a group of photographers and not by a single person - very interesting work.
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Feb 20, 2007

Have a look at the excellent photography of Grant Willing. Grant also has a fairly extensive Flickr page.
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Feb 19, 2007

I can’t quite decide what to make of Rachelle Mozman’s photography. Probably inevitably, many people will compare her work with Loretta Lux’s. I think a much more interesting comparison would be with Sally Mann’s photos of children, because, after all, the photos are interesting because of what they are supposed to convey (see Rachelle Mozman’s statement).
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Feb 19, 2007

On his website, Nobuhiro Fukui presents grids of a Tokyo seemingly deserted at night.
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Feb 14, 2007

Sze Tsung Leong’s photography might be compared with that of some of today’s “hottest” photographers. His mix makes it very interesting, and the effect he achieves in Horizons is quite amazing. Also see this page, and if you feel intellectual you might want to read this article. Update: There’s an excellent interview with Sze Tsung Leong here.
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Feb 14, 2007

Misty Keasler’s portfolio contains a set of very nice projects, incl. “Love Hotels”, which I just saw in New York. (updated entry)
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Feb 14, 2007

Sarah Sudhoff’s two projects “Sorority Rush” and “Repository” are both quite interesting, with the latter probably containing a bit more substance (no pun intended).
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Feb 7, 2007

“I have attempted to interpret the ending of their childhood by entering their imaginary spaces. The time when their dreams, fantasies, and fears would fuse seamlessly with real day-to-day life are ending, and the photographs I have made intend to crystallize this rapidly disappearing very personal and free space.” - Alessandra Sanguinetti about her series “The Adventures of Guille and Belinda and the Enigmatic Meaning of Their Dreams” (source). See more of her work here. Also don’t miss her photos taken in Palestine.
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Feb 6, 2007

The panoramic format is quite difficult to work with - unless you don’t mind of falling into the trap of showy stuff with no deeper appeal. Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Turkey Cinemascope contains some pretty nice examples of what you can do with a panorama - check it out!
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Feb 5, 2007

Matthew Monteith’s book Czech Eden is due to be out in May this year, and I’m really looking forward to it.
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Jan 31, 2007

Matthew Pillsbury’s “Screen Lives” is an homage to Hiroshi Sugimoto’s movie theater photos. As is often the case with homages, I am a bit torn, and I find the idea of investigating how much we depend on TV or computer screens a bit thin (isn’t it obvious?).
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Jan 26, 2007

Roberta Ruocco’s work is quite interesting. In the words of my friend Amy, she’s “dealing with girlhood and that […] pre-pubescent/adolescent age of longing to be more of a woman and less of a girl.”
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Jan 25, 2007

Edward Burtynsky’s photography is all about the destruction of our natural enviroment for our own well-being, or, as he phrases it “Our dependence on nature to provide the materials for our consumption and our concern for the health of our planet sets us into an uneasy contradiction.”
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Jan 24, 2007

The only thing I knew about Andres Serrano wasn’t even his name, it was one of his art works, and I didn’t even know it was a photograph (I thought it had been an actual installation - mixed media, as the art world would probably have called it). His work is quite interesting, albeit of somewhat mixed quality. While I think that some of his works is quite fascinating (for example, his photos of corpses possess a very terrible beauty; also check out this interview about him taking portraits of Ku-Klux Klan), while others are just, well… you know the kind of stuff you’d expect from a toddler who has just entered the phase where he or she is saying “dirty” words to get reactions out of people and for some reason knows how to take photos. The infamous Piss Christ might or might not belong to that category. Find a couple of background articles here and here.
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Jan 23, 2007

“‘This Is All So Temporary’ is a personal photographic journey, through a rapidly changing community and the lives of people who offer new visions of what it means to be young and queer today.” - Molly Landreth
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Jan 19, 2007

Stop whatever it is you’re doing, watch this film about Stephen Shore, and then go back to whatever it was you interrupted (if you can).
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Jan 18, 2007

“Growing up as a woman in a conservative Southern Baptist family and school system has affected my work tremendously, especially as I continue to revisit and collaborate with a specific group of young women from my hometown. Over the past two years, my photography has focused on this group of women with whom I attended church and private Christian school.” - Sarah Martin. Excellent work, make sure read the statements to get the full backgrounds of the individual projects.
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Jan 17, 2007

Arun Kuplas says his projects “examine aspects of layered traces of objects and people”.
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Jan 16, 2007

Stephen Miller’s website contains a series of interesting projects, including the very personal an remarkable Dad.
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Jan 15, 2007

“Motivated by the death of our mother on January 25, 2005, my fifteen-year-old brother David and I decided to leave our home in Moncton, New Brunswick, and drive across Canada in the hope of discovering ourselves and getting some perspective on our new family dynamic while exploring the history the country. We wondered if this road trip could heal us in some way.” - Jaret Belliveau
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Jan 14, 2007

It’s quite easy to find articles about Luisa Lambri’s work than actual photos. Here are more sample photos (plus a lot of text), and if you’re really up for a lot of text check out this or this review.
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Jan 12, 2007

Tania Fernandez’s Academia de Refinamiento shows what looks like a training school for aspiring models somewhere in Latin America.
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Jan 11, 2007

Vera Hartmann’s projects “Mars Society”, “SFU Porn”, and “Gun Club” are quite nice.
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Jan 10, 2007

The genius of Yvonne Todd’s portraits is that there’s always something that’s not quite right. Excellent!
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Jan 4, 2007

Sometimes, I have to piece together links from all over the place, because there is no single, central website, and this is the case for Philip-Lorca diCorcia (also see this page), who, a little while ago, was sued by one of the people whose photo he had taken candidly (the case was dismissed). While I’m not all that psyched about the pole “dancers”, his other work is quite excellent.
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Jan 3, 2007

Frederik Marsh’s website contains plenty of images for those people who like to look at photos of deserted apartments. Makes me wonder, though, how many of those photos you can really look at…
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Jan 2, 2007

Originally from Iran, Soody Sharifi hopes to “undo the images of Islamic stereotypes represented through the narrow focus of the daily media.” With our image of Islam shaped by people who at best are too lazy to bother with necessarily details, it’s an uphill struggle, and I am very glad to see photography like this.
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Jan 2, 2007

Michelle Sank’s photography mostly deals with adolescence, and there are some wonderful series there. Unfortunately, some of the photos are marred by image compression artifacts.
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Jan 1, 2007

Robert Wright’s website contains large sections of photos taken in and around US shopping malls. Well worth the time needed to look through all the photos.
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Dec 28, 2006

Kalpesh Lathigra’s photojournalistic folios are worth the visit, especially those that don’t cover the usual subject matter. (updated entry)
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Dec 22, 2006

Ian Baguskas’ portfolio contains a series of very nice projects, amongst them the quite wonderful “Search For The American Landscape”.
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Dec 19, 2006

About ten years ago, I studied philosophy on the side, and when a friend of mine recommended the book Nietzsche and Philosophy. I started reading it and just couldn’t get rid off the impression that what was in front of me was maybe the most elaborate bullshit I had ever come across. (You might object to me calling it like that, but right now, I’m under the influence of Bullshit and Philosophy, a book that I can only heartily recommend.) Fast forward to here and now. You might remember that a while ago, I wrote something about the use and contents of “statements” in photography. I have to admit that the reaction to that was quite unusual, since it ranged from enthusiastic emails to what comes close to character assassinations on various forums (it has forever escaped me why the internet for some people seems to remove any inhibitions as far as civilized discourse is concerned), with, I have to say, many people only selectively reading the piece. Given this experience I have been a bit reluctant to write about the twin brother of overly pretentious “statements”, but now I don’t have to worry any longer. Over at the excellent BLDBLOG, Geoff Manaugh has just written something about The crisis of unspecified specificity, and there’s really nothing I could add to his discussion.
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Dec 19, 2006

Photography that contains a high amount of visual high-fructose corn syrup (kitschy, over-the-top colours, models and sets photoshopped to rememble androids in a Lord of the Rings movie) dominates those glossy magazines where 30 pages of actual content is packed into 300 pages of ads, with the next effect of a shiny and often smelly (perfume samples!) brick of paper. The world of fashion photography is infinitely larger than the fine-art one, and I typically refrain from linking to it (it’s not like this kind of stuff is hard to find anyway). Occasionally, I do make an exception, though, and here is one, the work of Miles Aldridge. I saw some of his work printed big in Amsterdam, and it is visually quite compelling.
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Dec 4, 2006

Patti Hallock’s portfolio contains a few quite interesting projects. I especially like “Basements”.
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Nov 29, 2006

In her work, Isabelle Hayeur explores North American land- and cityscapes and how one is transformed into the other. One of my favourite projects is “Destinations”.
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Nov 26, 2006

Howard Henry Chen, who left Vietnam when he was three years old, has done a lot of work on documenting what the country looked like when he came back to visit. With this work he just won the Silver Eye 2006 Fellowship award. (updated entry)
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Nov 23, 2006

Amy Stein’s portfolio contains some pretty nice projects, amongst them Domesticated, which explores “our paradoxical relationship with the ‘wild’”. Amy also maintains her own blog. (updated entry)
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Nov 21, 2006

“Since I moved to the United States five years ago, my needs for self-expression has grown. However, my curiosity about how others deal with their identity in what is a fairly open society like America has increased.” - Shen Wei. Who says you can’t take interesting portraits any longer? Shen Wei has now been picked as one of the winners of the Hey, Hot Shots! Fall 2006. If you want to learn more about his work, check out the conversation I had with him a little while back. (updated entry)
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Nov 20, 2006

“Abandon, by American artist Jeff Bark is a series of elaborately constructed photographs re-examining the relationship between painting and photography.” (source)
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Nov 9, 2006

Jake Rowland’s work explores portraiture and what portraits tell us about people. His work reminds me of some of Thomas Ruff’s portraits, albeit not the ones you’re now probably thinking of. I don’t want to give away too much - lest I spoil Jake’s work for you. If you’re too impatient to find out for yourself what I’m talking about, here are a couple of those portraits: 1 and 2.
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Nov 7, 2006

Anna Bauer is one of the many young talents emerging from New York’s School of Visual Arts.
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Nov 3, 2006

Dean Kessmann’s work sits somewhere on the boundary between photography and conceptual art.
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Nov 2, 2006

Yiftach Belsky’s work explores some aspects of life in Israel that you don’t see too often.
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Oct 31, 2006

For fans of b/w photography (which has been a bit underrepresented here lately) there’s Simon Chang’s work. Originally from Taiwan, he is now at Prague’s FAMU.
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Oct 27, 2006

Lee Satkowski’s portrait of Chile contains an interesting mix of styles, all nicely executed.
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Oct 21, 2006

I rarely link to work like Bill Durgin’s, so I might as well do it now. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it - it’s just that my own interests in photography don’t extend in this direction.
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