Archives

1104 Articles in

Contemporary Photographers

SELECT A CATEGORY:

Feb 4, 2009

I’ve been wanting to link to Stefan Ruiz’s website for a while now, but it was down or rather “under reconstruction” (or whatever it said). But now it’s back up. So have a look at his work.
Read more »

Feb 3, 2009

I have the feeling that for some people, Lee Gainer’s work might be a bit too conceptual, but I think the site is well worth the visit, especially the projects at the top of the list. Make sure to read the statements.
Read more »

Jan 28, 2009

“In the absence of support organizations in Mexico created by and for little people, the Enanitos Toreros shows have, as an accidental side-effect, served as an itinerant meeting ground for individuals and families of children with dwarfism. Many people told me that these shows were their first-ever opportunity to engage with others who share their physical characteristics.” - Livia Corona
Read more »

Jan 22, 2009

Hospitals and computer centers are places of unashamed technology, by which I mean that the kind of technology used there can be (and typically is) designed way over the top, because, after all, who’s going to tell a hospital it looks ridiculous? For that reason I’ve always been fascinated by those places, and until I get to taking my own photos in those places there’ll be Neil Pardington’s The Clinic to look at (this found via Mrs. Deane).
Read more »

Jan 21, 2009

Monika Merva’s City of Children stands out amongst her projects.
Read more »

Jan 20, 2009

We have become used to the thinking that if there’s a flood, for example, then it’s Nature intruding on our living spaces, whereas in fact, it’s actually the other way around: By building on and changing what we see as Nature, we are intruding. Tim Hyde’s Repossession is an investigation of this idea (found via lenscratch)
Read more »

Jan 16, 2009

Stefan Abrams’ portfolio contains some very interesting series (this image is from “In Site”). Don’t miss “It’s a Wonderful Life”!
Read more »

Jan 15, 2009

I don’t remember where I read the other day that someone noted how at Photo LA there was a large number of works on display, which seemed very influenced (I think “derived” might have been the word used) by Gregory Crewdson’s aesthetic/style (actually, someone just sent me the link, it was here). I’m not necessarily the biggest fan of debating photography in such ways, even though I can see where people are coming from. In any case, JeanYves Lemoigne (found via tomorrow museum) might invite such comparisons (P.L. diCorcia anyone?). I’m torn about the work, though, because it just looks a tad too digital for me.
Read more »

Jan 5, 2009

If you want reviews of photography shows you typically have to look into your print media. I suppose the absence of such reviews in the world of blogs is based on the same reasons as the paucity of critical discussions of photography. A noteworthy exception is the blog dlk collection, which, however, seems to focus mostly on larger shows. Another very noteworthy exception is this review on the German blog Fotofeinkost. Unfortunately - you probably already guessed it! - it’s only in German. Shame, it would (and should) serve as a fine example of a really good review of a photography show.
Read more »

Jan 5, 2009

I have been thinking about landscape photography a lot lately. The problem with that type of photography is that there appears to be a sweet spot that is sandwiched between extremely decorative - some would probably prefer the word “kitschy” - work (everything you see in “National Geographic”) and extremely boring work (think Ansel Adams). Both extremes typically spend too much time on technical details since they both resulted from a history in which the “combination of sharp focus, tonal richness, and clarity of detail […] came more and more to be the subject of the photograph […] rather than a tool for artistic expression.” (Janet Malcolm, from “East and West”, an article I found in her 1980 collection of articles “Diane & Nikon”, emphasis in the original) Finding that spot in between - where things are neither plainly decorative or boring (or, yikes!, both) - seems to be quite hard. Justin Guilbert’s (Some Nudity) points in that direction.
Read more »

Dec 31, 2008

Another contribution, this one from Rick Olivier. If I receive further contributions, I’ll add them below this post.
Read more »

Dec 30, 2008

The New Madonnas “explores the complex relationships of mothers and their children: relationships that involve simultaneous connection and separation, intimacy and disengagement, reliance and independence.” - Niki Grangruth
Read more »

Dec 29, 2008

I used to be way more excited about piles of rocks or gravel in the past than I am now (and I never managed to find out what exactly attracted me to them in the first place), so now I’m a bit torn about Maegan Hill-Carroll photographs of “Mounds”.
Read more »

Dec 23, 2008

Eugen Sakhnenko’s In Praise of Shadows shows the interiors of nightclubs fully lit.
Read more »

Dec 18, 2008

There’s something for (almost) everybody in Gerald Edwards III’s portfolio, such as typologies of churches or the somewhat more complex and interesting Psych Securities LLC.
Read more »

Dec 17, 2008

The other day, I saw Dennis Witmer’s Kotzebue in book form - the web can hardly convey the beauty of the photography.
Read more »

Dec 11, 2008

Those of Zack Seckler’s “Fashion Week Noir” images that indeed have that black background are really quite nice (and I’m saying that as someone who is almost completely indifferent to “fashion photography”).
Read more »

Dec 10, 2008

Photographers documenting their families’ lives are not uncommon. Something I noticed is that a lot of that kind of photography is centered on showing “action” and/or what I want to call “tokens”: It’s almost as if many people think that family life isn’t happening when there’s nothing going on, or spaces need things to be arranged in unusual ways to show signs of family life. Katrina d’Autremont’s Si Dios Quiere is a welcome deviation from this, and I think hers might be the best portrayal of family life I’ve seen in a very long time.
Read more »

Dec 9, 2008

Bethany Souza’s “Sunshine State” (photography from Western Florida) still is work in progress, yet extremely promising.
Read more »

Dec 8, 2008

I just had a chance to see Sarah Wilson’s photography from a prom at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (Sarah was the official photographer of the prom) - an absolutely wonderful body of work.
Read more »

Nov 21, 2008

Found via Mrs Deane: The (recent) photography of Farhad Bomanjee.
Read more »

Nov 14, 2008

There’s a lot of very good photography on Maziar Moradi’s website (I especially like “1979”), and I wish it had more information about the work.
Read more »

Nov 11, 2008

“The communication towers in Iceland sporadically dot the landscape, suggesting a meandering invisible line that connects one community to the next. They appear in a variety of locations, such as in the middle of a private field, nestled into the mountains, or situated proudly in the center of towns, with the basic form typically being a repetition of a hut (often green) and a tower.” - Jamie Drouin
Read more »

Nov 7, 2008

I often think I don’t link to landscape photography as often as I should. So here’s Kate Greene’s work.
Read more »

Nov 5, 2008

“The intense bombing of World War II left many cities in Europe clogged with piles of rubble, the remains of demolished masonry buildings. This debris needed to be cleared for post-war rebuilding efforts to begin. After intact bricks were recovered for reuse, with much of the manual labor performed by women, the waste materials were transported to distributed collection locations and piled into hills known in German as Schuttberg or Trümmerberg. The debris hills are difficult to distinguish from naturally occurring features, having been landscaped into parks with manicured grass and densly vegetated sections.” - Noah Beil
Read more »

Oct 28, 2008

Jeff Rich’s Watershed portrays the French Broad River Basin in North Carolina and Tennessee, showing both landscapes and people living along the river. If I had to choose I’d probably say I prefer the landscapes over most of the portraits, but regardless it’s a well executed project with a lot of good imagery.
Read more »

Oct 22, 2008

Adam Golfer’s kin is “a documentary about the land [Germany] and the young people there”. While that’s not overly descriptive, I like the images.
Read more »

Oct 21, 2008

Have a look at Sean Salyards’ wonderful portrait of his grandmother.
Read more »

Oct 14, 2008

Joshua Dudley Greer’s American Histories visits places that are tied to some story (all of them violent), for example the one above (quoting from his site): “Bonnie Parker first saw Clyde Barrow as he was attempting to steal her mother’s car in 1930. That same day, Bonnie watched as Clyde robbed a general store and the two drove off together. The duo soon teamed up with Clyde’s brother Buck and a number of other accomplices to form the Barrow Gang. Over the next four years, the gang robbed numerous establishments in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri and Iowa, including this bank. In 1934, Bonnie and Clyde were ambushed by Louisiana police officers who were tipped off by an accomplice’s father. Without warning or an attempt to make an arrest, four police officers fired approximately 130 rounds into the fugitives’ car, killing both instantly. Bonnie Parker was 23 years old, Clyde Barrow was 25.”
Read more »

Oct 13, 2008

There’s no shortage of recent photography of “cosplayers” or “second life” characters, which I think is a bit unfortunate, because how many of such photos can you look at before it gets tiring (my personal threshold is quite low actually, but yours might be higher)? And did you know that there are other subcultures, with equally weird (or even weirder) habits? For example, did you know that there are people who collect old vacuum cleaners and who meet up to see whose vacuum cleaner performs best under carefully controlled circumstances? I didn’t, but now I do, after having seen Brian Berman’s work on those subcultures - I really hope somebody will give him a book deal.
Read more »

Oct 9, 2008

For the most part, Tomoko Yoneda’s work is centered on history and its relations with places.
Read more »

Oct 6, 2008

I don’t speak Japanese, which, unfortunately, often makes it next to impossible for me to find information on Japanese photographers online. I just found Masataka Nakano’s book Tokyo Blackout (you can see some images here - click on the images to see the following ones), and my attempts to find more information online are quite meagre. Here’s another page with some samples.
Read more »

Oct 2, 2008

Eleanor Antin “delves into history - whether of ancient Rome, the Crimean War, the salons of nineteenth-century Europe, or her own Jewish heritage and Yiddish culture - as a way to explore the present.” (source, with lots of additional materials)
Read more »

Oct 1, 2008

Nathan Baker’s work is very conceptual. I like Rupture (which my brain initially misread as “Rapture”) the best.
Read more »

Oct 1, 2008

I have long been a fan of Gregory Crewdson’s work, and I recently received “Beneath the Roses” as a gift. After unpacking the book I should have waited for actual day light to look at it, but how can a new photo book be placed on my table with me not looking at it? So I decided to quickly flip through the book, kind of like a “trailer” if you will: “This is all the stuff you’ll get to enjoy tomorrow morning, when the light is good (and when you don’t have to live with the weird yellowish-green light of energy-saving bulbs).” Of course, my eye was mostly drawn towards the people in the photos, and with every image followed quickly by the next I noted that there is what looks like a somewhat narrow range of “activities” - if you want to call it an “activity” if someone stands in front of a mirror, staring at a reflection. I’m going to slightly exaggerate here, but it looks like there are lots of men staring into weird holes in their houses, and lots of women (many of them naked) who are somehow unsettled by their own selves. And that made me wish for more - sure, there is a lot of emptiness in suburbia (and in those other places depicted in the book), but emptiness and disillusionment cannot possibly all there is?! Maybe this points towards what I’d be tempted to call a Lynchian stereotyping of American life, where there are “uncanny” (you can’t write a serious photo blog and not use the word “uncanny” at least once) things going on, but they’re kind of all the same. I’m not even arguing that these human activities are all real (for all I know surburbanites could all be extremely happy campers), but I wager that if people are disillusioned or unhappy or frustrated or whatever else they might be (and I’m sure there are enough people who experience something like this) then the range of responses is probably a bit wider than what Lynch and/or Crewdson would want us to believe. But then, maybe photography and film mirror what you see in literature, where you know that when you read author XYZ you’re bound to get, for example, a neurotic character obsessed with sex, whose inner monologue you’ll find laid out across 600 pages. As a consequence you know that when you hear, for example, the name Tim Burton the movie will be Johnny Depp plus Helena Bonham Carter plus weird machinery, all way overproduced, plus an extremely annoying score by Danny Elfman. But then I could just be wrong about this all.
Read more »

Sep 30, 2008

A must-read post by Simon Roberts on editing one’s work.
Read more »

Sep 30, 2008

Samantha Cohn’s portfolio contains some nice portraiture.
Read more »

Sep 26, 2008

The clown might be the profession most secretly despised. Children actually hate clowns, research I can back up with what friends have told me (as a kid, I found clowns not so much scary as outright annoying). Siri Hayes’ portraits of clowns add another twist to the whole complex, in that the clowns/actors (or whatever you call a person who plays a clown) the process of getting rid off their makeup, and there’s a (short) interview with Siri Hayes at Zoum Zoum (where I found the work).
Read more »

Sep 24, 2008

Some interesting imagery over at Xia Tio’s site.
Read more »

Sep 19, 2008

I like Billie Mandle’s photography of confessional chambers (or whatever those are called) confessionals, even though I would have preferred to get more information on the project instead of a cryptic one liner from the Bible.
Read more »

Sep 17, 2008

Check out Jake Stangel’s “Transamerica” - it’s a bit hit and miss, but there are some gems in it.
Read more »

Sep 15, 2008

Dustin Shum just turned his it isnae disney series into the book “Themeless Parks”, which you can buy directly via his website - I own a copy, and you really want to do yourself a favour and get one (it’s only $23 for a hardcover that usually would set you back at least $40 to 50).
Read more »

Sep 9, 2008

Chris Schedel’s Coming Home Never Felt So Good shows Midwestern suburban housing subdivisions - before the real-estate bubble burst (which is now transforming many of those areas into America’s newest ghost towns).
Read more »

Sep 4, 2008

Jessica Backhaus’ photography is centered on quiet moments.
Read more »

Sep 3, 2008

Mary Frey just finished setting up her website, which gives an overview of her work all the way back to 1979. Make sure to look through all the projects since they are very different.
Read more »

Aug 27, 2008

Unfortunately, it’s very hard to find much about Hiroh Kikai’s photography online. His portraiture is amazing, whereas I find his other work a bit forgettable. If you live in New York, you can still (until 7 Sept) see some of his portraits, which are part of ICP’s Heavy Light (which, for me, was by far the best photography show to see in New York this Summer).
Read more »

Aug 26, 2008

Via Exposure Compensation I found Daniel Mirer’s work, whose “War Games” contains quite a few gems.
Read more »

Aug 25, 2008

Christian Weber’s portfolio contains a variety of work, some of which I like a lot.
Read more »

Aug 22, 2008

Andrew Curtis’s Cell is another variation on the theme “Portraits of people illuminated by electronic devices” - and a very nice one!
Read more »

Aug 21, 2008

Have a look at Joshua Lutz “Meadowlands”. (updated entry)
Read more »


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23